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Summer Online Courses

Academic Credit From Your Home

Berkeley Summer Sessions offers several online courses. Our learning environment allows you flexibility with your study schedule while you experience the quality and excellence of UC Berkeley courses from the convenience of your own home. Even if you can't physically come to Berkeley, you can still experience the best that UC Berkeley has to offer. Regular Summer Sessions fees are applicable to online courses. Information on regular fees can be found here.

You can contact your Online Learning Support Specialist with any questions at summer_online_support@berkeley.edu.

We provide the support you need to be successful. After you enroll, your Online Learning Support Specialist will contact you to ensure that you have the tools you need to access the courses and participate fully in the interactive online learning environment. Full 24/7 technical support is available to you throughout your course.

2015 Summer Online Courses

Berkeley Summer Sessions is excited to offer the following online courses for Summer 2015:

African American Studies W111 Molecular and Cell Biology W61
Astronomy W12 Political Science W135
Chemistry N3AL Political Science W145A
Civil Engineering W30/Mechanical Engineering W85 Psychology W1
English as a Second Language W9 Statistics W21
Letters & Science W1 Theater 118AC
Math W53  

Summer courses offered by UC Online:

Engineering W7

 

Online Course Descriptions

 

African American Studies W111 - Race, Class, and Gender
Syllabus
Course Schedule
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
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The goal of this course is to describe, interpret and explain the circumstances of African Americans, with regard to race, class and gender stratification in the contemporary USA. We begin with consideration of key concepts, including racialization, racism and ethnicity; Black nationalism, leadership and identity; wealth, income and inequality; sex, gender and the gender division of labor; feminism and Black feminism; and globalization and international migration. We briefly explore the historical background to contemporary stratification by considering theories of 'the declining significance of race' (as argued by William Julius Wilson) and the move from plantation to ghetto, and then from ghetto to penitentiary as controlling institutions used against African Americans (as argued by Loic Wacquant). We also consider how Black women and girls have been left out of the larger debates on these issues (as argued by Nikki Jones), and how consideration of them complicates the analysis. We move on to consider the role of economics, politics, demography, class relations, and racist ideologies in the prevalent patterns of stratification; and the role of black leadership and cultural strategies in reducing inequality. We also consider the principles underlying federal policies for alleviating racial inequality and promoting equal opportunities. Throughout the analysis we consider the impact of gender ideologies on these experiences, and we distinguish the experiences of men and women. We then examine the changing relationship of racist images and racialized structures in the age of Obama and the 'post-racial' society; and assess how globalization impacts African Americans. As the course unfolds we will also consider the unique experiences of African Americans in California, as compared with African Americans across the USA in general, to assess what are the common and what are the distinctive patterns. Most of the time we will focus on African Americans; but we will also consider how their experiences compare with those of other Blacks, especially West Indians and Africans born abroad, but whose children are born/raised in the USA.

Please note: Final Exam will be held on Thursday, August 13, 2015 from 1 to 4 p.m. (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Astronomy W12 - The Planets Cross-listed with Earth and Planetary Science W12
Syllabus
Course Schedule
2014 Course Intro Video
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
Mastering Astronomy Student Registration Handout
Register

CONTACT

A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.

Instructor Intro Video

Please note: Final Exam will be on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 from 6 to 8 p.m. (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Chemistry N3AL - Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Syllabus
Course Schedule
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
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CONTACT

Introduction to the theory and practice of methods used in the organic chemistry laboratory. An emphasis is placed on the separation and purification of organic compounds. Techniques covered will include extraction, distillation, sublimation, recrystallization, and chromatography. Detailed discussions and applications of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be included (All introductory lectures, lab safety and equipment instruction will happen online. Lab sessions will be scheduled during evening hours on campus).

Please note: All lecture material is presented entirely over the Internet. Lab sections take place in regular lab rooms. Lab exam will be held on Wednesday, August 5, 2015 from 8 to 9 p.m. (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Civil Engineering W30/Mechanical Engineering W85 - Introduction to Solid Mechanics
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
CONTACT

A review of equilibrium for particles and rigid bodies. Application to truss structures. The concepts of deformation, strain and stress. Equilibrium equations for a continuum. Elements of the theory of linear elasticity. The states of plane stress and plane strain. Solution of elementary elasticity problems (beam bending, torsion of circular bars). Euler buckling in elastic beams.

Please note: Final Exam will be on Friday, August 14, 2015 and the time is TBD (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Letters & Science W1 - Exploring the Liberal Arts
PENDING COURSE APPROVAL
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
CONTACT

Letters and Science 1 is a course for entering students, particularly those who are excited to be here but uncertain of where to start their explorations. It provides an introduction to the intellectual landscape of the College of Letters and Science, revealing the underlying assumptions, goals and structure of a liberal arts education. Guest speakers, drawn largely from the faculty and recent graduates of L&S, will shed light on the nature and attractions of their disciplines. Topics will be both theoretical and practical: for example, you’ll learn why the L&S breadth requirement exists and also get a good sense of which disciplines would be most engaging for you to pursue while satisfying breadth. The ultimate goal of the course is to transform students into informed participants in their own educational experiences at Berkeley.

Please note: The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Math W53 - Multivariable Calculus
Syllabus
Course Schedule
2014 Instructor Intro Video
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
Register

CONTACT

The purpose of this course is to introduce the basic notions of multivariable calculus which are needed in mathematics, science, and engineering. Para- metric equations and polar coordinates. Vectors in 2- and 3-dimensional Euclidean spaces. Partial derivatives. Multiple integrals. Vector calculus. Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

Please note: Final Exam will be held on Thursday, August 13, 2015 from 9 a.m. to noon (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Molecular and Cell Biology W61 - Brain, Mind, and Behavior
Syllabus (subject to change by professor)
Course Schedule (subject to change by professor)
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
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CONTACT

This course deals with the structure and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on how brain physiology and chemistry are related to human behavior. This is a comprehensive introduction to the exciting field of contemporary neuroscience for students of all backgrounds and interests.

Please note: Final Exam to be TBD (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, May 17, 2015.

Political Science W135 - Game Theory in Social Sciences
PENDING COURSE APPROVAL
CONTACT

Political science deals with the behavior of individuals in settings of collective or group choice. The best course of action for any individual to take in such settings generally depends on the course of action taken by others with whom they interact. For instance, the best strategy by a candidate in an election campaign might depend on the strategy adopted by other candidates. The best approach for achieving gains in a peace settlement for one nation-state depends on how other nation-states will react. Game theory is the analysis of decision making in situations where one individual's best action depends on the actions taken by other individuals. This course provides a relatively non-technical introduction to game theory and its application in social science, especially political science and also economics.

The purposes of the course are to give students a sense of the field of game theory and how political scientists use it in making arguments about how government and politics work, to develop students' intuition about strategic situations in everyday life, and to develop students' analytical capabilities generally. Upon completion of the course , students will be able to depict social situations as simple game theoretic models, analyze those models to understand how the behaviors of the individuals involved are mutually reinforcing, and apply computer-based tools to evaluate decisions under conditions of uncertainty.

Instructor's Note on Course Background: The course requires (and helps develop) the ability to think abstractly and to read formal expressions. These abilities are often correlated with mathematical ability. That said, the actual level of mathematics required in the course is relatively light. Furthermore, it is my conviction that every student at Berkeley can fully succeed in this course. If you find yourself struggling or need extra help, do not hesitate to let me know as soon as you recognize this. You will succeed if you are willing to think and work, but you have to help me help you.

Political Science W145A - Understanding Political Developments in India
Syllabus
Course Schedule
2014 Course Overview Video
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
Register

CONTACT

This class, which focuses mostly on the 'domestic' politics of India, has multiple aims. In addition to providing an overview of political developments in India since Independence, this online course assesses the nature of democratic participation and representation in contemporary India – the world's largest democracy. While the assigned readings for this course have India as their sole focus, class participants are encouraged to think comparatively not only across the cases discussed but also look at other nations so that we can better understand representation in political life in India.

Please note: Final Exam to be TBD (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Psychology W1 - General Psychology
Syllabus
Course Schedule
2014 Course Intro Video
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
Register

CONTACT

Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology. The content of this course is identical with that of the offering of this course during the regular academic year. However, because there are no formal discussion sections, approximately 50% more lectures have been added, permitting the professor to cover the various topics in greater depth and breadth.

Please note: Final Exam will be held on Friday, August 14, 2015 from 9 a.m. to noon (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Statistics W21 - Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
Syllabus
Course Schedule
2014 Course Intro Video
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide
Register

CONTACT

Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business Descriptive statistics, probability models and related concepts, sample surveys, estimates, confidence intervals, tests of significance, controlled experiments vs. observational studies, correlation, and regression.

Please note: Final Exam will be held on Thursday, August 13, 2015 at a time TBA (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.

Theater 118AC - Performance, Television, and Social Media
PENDING COURSE APPROVAL
Student Orientation Guide
Who to Contact for Support Guide

CONTACT

This course examines the intersections of performance and media–specifically the media forms of television and social media in the U.S.–with a focus on how various types of difference (race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic class) are enacted, articulated, represented, and played on TV and social media platforms.

Units 1-4 of the course will be dedicated to learning “critical frameworks” for understanding and interpreting television. We will read texts that define television as a medium, and that explain the division between the eras of “network” and “post-network” television. We will then turn to texts that allow us to grasp the many intersections of performance theory and television, which include the TV industry’s roots in New York theater, the unique modes of acting required by television roles, and the numerous ways that television audiences “perform” for one another in response to the media they consume, for example by writing stories based on their favorite shows and sharing them online. The final set of critical frameworks will be theories borrowed from the fields of critical race studies, Marxist cultural studies, gender and women’s studies, and queer studies. These readings will help students build a foundation for perceiving and discussing how race, class, gender, and sexuality appear on, and are addressed by, television (or, how these features are suppressed and ignored).

In Units 5-9, we will concentrate on “Representations and Enactments” of specific minority groups in historical and contemporary television texts: African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino/as, indigenous people, and LGBT people. In this section of the course, students will be expected to become knowledgeable about the specific issues involved with the mass media representation of each group, and also will be expected to apply the critical lenses learned in Units 1-4, especially those from the field of performance studies, to the texts and groups that we discuss.
In Unit 10, we turn from television to social media, learning “Critical Frameworks” for comprehending how social media networks are sites of performance, and how all users adopt personas and identities when they participate in social media platforms.

In Units 11-13, we will analyze how race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and socioeconomic class are expressed, defined, and performed on social media sites.

Please note: Final Exam will be held on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 from 1 to 4 p.m. (Final exam date is tentative; subject to change by professor). The deadline to register/add this course is midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on Sunday, June 14, 2015.


 

Summer Courses Offered by UC Online

UC Online offers a chance to take classes developed by some of the university’s most outstanding faculty and to earn transferable credit that can be applied at any UC campus. Questions about UC Online courses should be directed to +1 (855) 826-2255 or support@uconline.edu.

Engineering W7 - Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers
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Elements of procedural and object-oriented programming. Induction, iteration, and recursion. Real functions and floating-point computations for engineering analysis. Introduction to data structures. Representative examples are drawn from mathematics, science, and engineering. The course uses the MATLAB programming language. CCN: 36833

Please note: The final exam time and location are TBA.